Our Causes

1,000
BITTER
WORDS

CAMPAIGN MISSION

Reveal the cancer words and phrases that trigger frustration, disconnect and charged emotions.

We believe the language associated with cancer is old, outdated and has negative associations.

In the last 100 years, the language around cancer has been shaped by the cancer industry. Words like terminal, cancer-free, fighting, winning and losing, and phrases like “she lost her brave fight” are nothing more than taglines and marketing hooks to keep us fearful and caught up in the drama.

Enough is enough.

This is how we will Stop a War with Love.

We will gather 1,000 bitter words (or phrases), write a statement on your behalf, and call on you to participate in turning the most bitter and triggering words into a one-minute film. This is another way we will Stop a War with Love.

Our Causes

10,000
Letters

MOVEMENT MISSION

Gather, unite and give power to the wise voices of people who have died with cancer.

We believe cancer is more about love–not war–and the dying holds the true meaning of life.

Found in letters and last dying words, we want to gather the messages and create a Cancerlight Manifesto. It reveals the moments of grace, as a result of the cancer experience and sends a loud message to people who have the privilege of living through cancer.

This movement’s mission will contribute to Stopping a War with Love.

When we have 10,000 messages our film crew will fly to where you are in the UK, USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and somewhere in Europe to share with you this legacy. We want to know what you have to say about the person you love.

Seven families will be featured in the Film 72 Hours: Stopping a War With Love.

Our Causes

100,000
PLEDGES

MOVEMENT MISSION

Have the ‘War on Cancer’ Act of 1971, declared by former President Nixon publicly withdrawn.

Former President Nixon declared a war on cancer in 1971.

It’s the war that never ended and advocates of the National Cancer Act are now suggesting “Perhaps ‘war’ was the wrong metaphor.” Most scientists recognised that cancer was an extremely complex group of diseases and that success would come in small increments.

President Joe Biden reignited the Cancer Moonshot to “end cancer as we know it” in 2022. While there was no talk of ‘war’, the presence of survival connotations was still present. However, the act takes into consideration improving the quality of the lived experience.